Healthy relationship building

Learning how to build healthy relationships, or just relationships in general, start at a very young age. From how they see their parents interact with each other, to how their siblings treat them, having healthy relationship building skills are essential to early childhood development.

Of course, parents play a huge role in helping them build healthy social behaviors. Show your child love, honesty, respect. Which, we are pretty sure you are doing a great job at. But we bet you didn’t know that allowing your student to participate in activities like theater, choir and dance also helps promote healthy relationship building.

Attentiveness/Communication

Have you ever been telling the best, most epic story of your life to your close friend and as you’re telling it in the most dramatic way you know how, you look up to see that they are playing on their phone. Angry, angry is how you would feel. If we can break those habits young, especially in the booming age of technology, when they are adults, they won’t offend anyone with their lack of attentiveness.

The arts can help with this. Being a member of a production, no matter how big or small, calls for you to pay attention, because if you are not, you could miss your que, your note or the dance move on the stage. Which could lead to never being called back for a role ever again. Okay, maybe it’s not that serious, but you get the point.

Commitment

Being committed to anything as a child, other than school, is certainly an accomplishment. They have such a short attention span and can easily lose interest quickly. Once a student is exposed to the arts and they are interested and active, they will be committed and give it their all. Even if they haven’t exactly perfected their craft quite yet. Putting their full energy into the arts and being committed shows great signs of healthy relationship building.

One of our students, a 4th grader, was having problems catching this dance move for our show The Lion King. You could physically see the frustration in her face and as much as we suggested that she can participate in a different part of the show, she was determined to hit the move right. Eventually, she caught on with much practice and support from her parents. The point here is,that she never gave up and was very committed to learning and getting it right for our performance. That shows that she surely exhibits signs of healthy relationship building.

The arts are more than just learning a new script or memorizing your do-re-mis, it is about becoming the best you, you can be; whether that is in your friendships, in school or becoming a social butterfly. To learn more about how you can engage your student in the arts, visit us at www.dramaticeducation.com.